Press Release

Green Hills Software expands leadership in automotive cybersecurity

Adopts international standards ISO/SAE 21434 and UNECE WP.29 to supplement its proven security products and processes

Green Hills Software, the worldwide leader in embedded safety and security, announced it has adopted the two new international security standards and regulations for automotive cybersecurity – ISO/SAE 21434 and UNECE WP.29 – for the INTEGRITY® real-time operating system (RTOS) and associated products and services. For decades, Green Hills has been an industry-recognized leader helping electronics manufacturers create and deploy embedded systems at the highest levels of safety and security. By offering compliant products and associated evidence reports for these new standards, Green Hills will build upon its proven pedigree as the foundational run-time software provider trusted by OEMs and their Tier 1 suppliers for automotive electronics. Utilizing these new security standards enables manufacturers to design and deploy purpose-built, secure, software-defined systems in connected vehicles, including highly automated driving, high performance compute clusters, domain controllers, vehicle gateways, telematics, keyless entry, diagnostic connections and electric vehicle charging stations, to name a few.

As reliance on vehicle connectivity grows and demand for software-defined services rises, the risk of cyberattacks against connected vehicles continues to rise. With over 100 ECUs and hundreds of millions of lines of code, connected vehicles are a target-rich platform for cyberattacks. Multiple points of entry to modern connected vehicles provide opportunities for malicious vehicle control, fraud, and data-breaches that threaten companies, drivers, and road users. A single exploited security vulnerability could put an entire fleet of vehicles at risk, numbering in the millions. With nearly 80% of new cars connected1 to the internet, cybersecurity breaches have the potential to put billions of dollars in sales and lawsuits at risk – not to mention the damage to brand reputation.

As a result, governmental bodies and independent regulators are drafting two related measures for managing cybersecurity threats throughout a connected vehicle’s lifecycle. Green Hills is collaborating with its customers and adopting cybersecurity assessment policies for the following:

  • The draft ISO/SAE 21434 “Road vehicles – Cybersecurity engineering” Standard was recently published by SAE International and ISO (Organization for Standardization). It is a baseline for vehicle manufacturers and suppliers to ensure cybersecurity risks are managed efficiently and effectively from both a product lifecycle and organizational perspective spanning concept, development, production, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning.
  • The WP.29 regulations from the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) make OEMs responsible for cybersecurity mitigation in four cybersecurity areas spanning the entire vehicle lifecycle: managing cyber risks; securing vehicles by design; detecting and responding to security incidents; and providing safe and secure over-the-air (OTA) software updates. While WP.29 defines concrete examples of threats and mitigations, OEMs can choose how they show the threats are addressed, such as complying with ISO/SAE 21434. The regulation is expected to be finalized in early 2021 and applied initially to many member nations including European nations, South Korea, UK, and Japan, and will likely influence vehicle homologation polices in the US, Canada and China.

WP.29 will be legally binding within adopting countries, and while the ISO/SAE 21434 standard is not a regulation, it is expected to be widely accepted in the global industry like ISO 26262 is today.

“Connected cars bring significant risks and rewards to OEMs and their suppliers,” said Chris Rommel, Executive Vice President, IoT & Industrial Technology at VDC Research. “Green Hills has earned a high stature in the industry for supplying security-critical foundational software to companies building life-critical systems like aircraft avionics, vehicle ADAS and medical equipment, and its support of these new cybersecurity standards is noteworthy.”

“ISO/SAE 21434 and WP.29 are valuable additional steps towards protecting connected vehicles from cybersecurity vulnerabilities,” said Dan Mender, VP of Business Development at Green Hills Software. “Green Hills has decades of experience developing and delivering security-certified technologies at the highest levels. Adopting these standards expands our offerings to global automotive OEMs and their suppliers bringing the industry’s leading secure software run-time environment to next-generation connected vehicle electronics.”

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